Only in Bangkok? Something you might not see anywhere else

I was out walking on Rachadamri Street this morning- around 7:45 a.m. It is common to see Monks out for morning alms about this time, generally morning alms take place from 5:30 a.m. to around 8:00 a.m.

What is not common is to see a car pull over on a busy street like Rachadarmi, park illegally with the hazard lights on, have the driver jump out with a plastic bag and run after a Monk. The Monk was walking the same direction; the driver of the car hustled past the Monk, knelt for respect, removed food from the plastic bag, placed it in the Alms bowl and received a blessing from the Monk.

The Monk walked on, the driver hustled back to his car, still running and still parked illegally and just barely out of traffic, turned off the hazard lights, pulled back into traffic and was gone.

Maybe two minutes total, from pulling over, running past the Monk, kneeling, giving alms, receiving a prayer, running back to the car and driving off. A morning commute, giving and blessing included!

For more about a traditional giving of Alms: https://faranginbangkok.wordpress.com/2010/03/22/alms-for-monks/

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About faranginbangkok

Additional pictures: http://www.tumblr.com/blog/faranginbangkok For more updates about Bangkok, Thailand and other thoughts: www.twitter.com/lilrichardb I began working in Bangkok during 2008- a time that featured a great deal of political unrest in Thailand and particularly Bangkok. I had lived in San Francisco for 15 years and was working on a project in Thailand. Generally I spent 2 weeks in Bangkok and then 3-4 weeks in San Francisco. Did Bangkok begin to feel like home? Yes, and No. Bangkok and the Thai culture forced me to feel many things, the change in culture and environment was so dramatic it forced the decision- embrace or ignore. I embraced and made Bangkok my home and base in 2009. I have enjoyed living in Bangkok, experiencing Thailand and the entire ASEAN region.
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